REVISITING THANK YOU, 1995 ALBUM OF DURAN DURAN

ALBUM REVIEW    :           THANK YOU

ARTIST                      :           DURAN DURAN

GENRE                      :           POP / ROCK

DATE RELEASED   :           1995

At this time in 1995, Duran Duran was already a formidable British Act.  Many of their contemporaries during the eighties British Invasion era were gone already before the first day of the nineties decade even started.  This band gained popularity in America which is quite a feat considering that not all British performers will find success on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean.  Over a decade in their illustrious career, the band finally decided to craft a cover album.

Yes, usually an album full of remake and cover version is sometimes mandatory to fill in contract requirements or to fill a gap in between creative moments.  However, there is always that danger of being compared with the original artists who performed the song.  This was the problem of this album.  Apparently some fans and music critics of the original artists whose songs were covered by Duran Duran in this record were purist at heart and were unforgiving and declared that the cover versions were repulsive and the band bastardized the song.

Twenty years after the album was released, loyal fans of Duran Duran are still stoic on this record; its either they intentionally forgot that this existed or they don’t care at all.  The album was produced at the time when the band was finding their own place in the nineties after 80’s sound was relegated as nostalgic; they have to be relevant.  Thus, their efforts during this decade bordered on rock and alternative rock.  Perhaps, they had intentions to show to the world that they can do rock by doing covers on iconic songs from Bob Dylan, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, Sly and the Stones, Led Zeppelin, Public Enemy, The Temptations, The Doors, Elvis Costello, and GrandMaster Melle Mel.

There were several problems with this record as the selected songs were not cohesive and coherent with each other.  First, it is quite unimaginable to lump Led Zeppelin and The Temptations in one album of covers.  Second, the attempt to stamp Duran Duran’s own personality in the songs make listeners realized how good the original versions were.  Third, the whole record is to showcase musical appreciation of the band not to reveal innate talents and paying homage to their musical influences.  As a result, perhaps fans, non fans, and music critics were disappointed because they want to relate to the band but it seems that the choice of songs did not augur well with their expectations of doing cover versions on songs that they are familiar with.  It’s a good thing though that “Thank You,” White Lines,” and “ I Wanna Take You Higher” was quite fun to listen to.

I rate this record twenty years after at 2.5 stars out of 5 stars.

Ratings Description:

1 star = Ignore it

2 stars= risk it

3 stars = borrow or buy it

4 stars = buy it and keep it

5 = buy, keep, and treasure it

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